Archives for February, 2019

Are You Mishitting Your Driver?

When you don’t hit the center line of your driver, you lose distance and direction control.  I recently watched a video that summarized the problems that we cause when we mishit our drivers.  Gene Parente, the president of Golf Laboratories and the designer of the golf swing robot (often call: Iron Byron) shared some amazing test results.

His lab tests all brands of golf clubs to determine the distance and direction that you can expect when hitting a ball in the dead center of the club face as well as ¾” to the inside and to the outside of dead center.

Iron Byron tests clubs for the perfect swing to determine the problems caused by the point of impact on the club face. Center Line is perfect. Anywhere else can be a problem.

When the Robot is setup with a Swing Speed to hit a 200 Yard Shot (with a right handed driver):
1/ Dead Center impact provides the straightest and longest hit.
2/ An impact at ¾ of an inch to the OUTSIDE of dead center will lose about 9 yards in distance and the shot will fade to the right by about 10 yards. Faster club head speeds create worse fads.
3/ An impact at ¾ of an inch to the INSIDE of dead center will ALSO lose 9 yards in distance and will push the shot left of center and then fade back to the target line.

Of course if the club face is crossing the ball from the outside to inside or inside to outside you will add more fad or draw respectively.

This explains why it is so hard to control a driver. Hitting on the center-line and half way up the face creates a dead straight shot. Mishits inside or outside of the center-line will BOTH add fade to your ball. That’s also why it is so critical to swing from the inside and up the target line WITH A SLIGHTLY CLOSED FACE to add a draw spin to your drives. Any swing mishitting the face of your driver with extra swing speed and especially an over the top swing will exaggerate your fade into a killer slice.

Your driver may give you the opportunity to get further down the fairway but that extra distance can all be wasted when you land in the rough or behind trees. Because a mishit driver on the outside or inside of the center-line will create a fade, you should either setup to create a draw (with your trailing foot lightly back from your target line) or line up your aim for the left side if every fairway and accept the fade is it happens.

Understanding the natural fade of a mishit driver is critical for every round of golf. You really should test your driver marking the face with a powder marker or by spraying the face with Dr Scholl’s Foot Powder. Knowing where your ball impacts on the face of your club and seeing the result can be a real wake-up call for corrective action.

Practice for a consistent swing with every club in your bag. Use your GOLFSTR+ to help you focus on the control of your straight leading arm to impact on the center-line of every club. Buy one today at www.golfstr.com

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The Miracle of Consistent Golf

Is it really possible to find that special MIRACLE that you need to consistently hit every shot?  It’s most likely a personal thing for every golfer but I’m happy to report that I discovered that single SIMPLE THING that was messing up my consistency. Of course there are many things that we all need to do as reminders for every shot in golf but my missing MIRACLE was so simple that I am embarrassed to report it. Keeping my Eye on the ball!

I know that there are many things that we all need to do to maintain a consistent swing so I have decided to share my personal list and you should create your list too.

1/ Keep my Eye on the Ball: Do not take your eye off the ball during the back swing and down through impact. This is so important for my drives, fairway shots, chipping and putting that I can attribute every one of my missed shots to the instant that I must have taken my eye off the ball. If I focus on the ball I don’t hit the ball fat or thin. [Shanking and toeing the ball are 2 other issues that I cover later.]

Don’t sway back. Ben Hogan loaded onto his leading leg at the top of his backswing. You should too.

I now draw an eye ball on 2 sides of my ball (with eye lashes) as a reminder to keep my eye on the ball. It ain’t pretty but I love it when my playing partners call out “there’s an eye on that ball”. Of course there are other things that I do for consistent hits but not keeping my eye on the ball is a killer.  It keeps me from taking too much backswing and it forces me to STOP swaying back like a baseball batter windup.

2/ Never Gloat: Never talk or think about my success as it goes right to my head and kills my next hole.

3/ Stay in MY Mental Golf Zone:  It’s like a numb feeling or mental fog that keeps me calm and relaxed. On critical shots I mentally say “Sweep-In-Pose” to block out any other thought during my swing. “Sweep” for a wide takeaway, “In” to remind me to loop my club down at the top and lag before I swing inside up the slot and “Pose” to finish in balance and watch my amazing shot.

4/ Waggle to Relax: Use a take-away waggle (like Rickie Fowler) to ensure that I start my take-away with my spine and hip rotation. It also loosens up my body for a consistent take-away.

Get the feeling for weight forward by hitting balls with your weight forward. That shift will start to happen naturally during your backswing.

5/ Lag: I take my time in my backswing to ensure that I create my wrist lag as I shift my weight to my leading leg. [If I can’t slow down enough for my weight shift or “bump”, I just start my round with more pressure on my leading leg.  Eventually the rhythm and bump work their way into my natural backswing.]

6/ Special Setup for my Driver and Woods: Line up the center-line of the club face beyond the ball for a wide takeaway and “swing up the inside slot” (AKA Jim McLean’s mantra) to avoid hitting off the toe.

Create your critical swing factors and then put them to the test. Track your success on every hole by marking the corners of the square for each hole on your score card: Upper left mark a 1 for hitting the fairway, upper right corner mark 1 for GIR and lower right for number of putts. At the end of every round total these numbers and count your pars (birdies count as 2 pars). Compare your progress from round to round and keep track of your Personal World Record.

Of course GOLFSTR+ is the training aid that I use to help build a consistent swing for every club in my game. Buy one today at www.golfstr.com

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